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City of Peoria - Frequently Asked Construction Questions

1.

How do I report streets in need of repair?

2.

How do I request paving or re-paving on my street?

3.

How do I request a sidewalk or sidewalk repair on my street?

4.

How do I find out what streets or lanes are closed because of road construction?

5.

How do I report loud noise caused by construction work?

6.

How do I report excess dust from a construction project?

7.

How do I know what projects the city is planning?

8.

Iím concerned about speeding & cut-through traffic in my neighborhood . . .

9.

Why do some construction projects take so long?


1. How do I report streets in need of repair?

Request service online at www.peoriaaz.gov/streetrepair, or call the Public Works Streets Division at (623) 773-7432 (Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.).


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2. How do I request paving or re-paving on my street?

The Public Works Streets Division at (623) 773-7432 will take requests for paving or re-paving and refer them to the Pavement Maintenance Supervisor. (Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.).


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3. How do I request a sidewalk or sidewalk repair on my street?

Request service online at www.peoriaaz.gov/streetrepair, or call the Public Works Streets Division at (623) 773-7432 (Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.).

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4. How do I find out what streets or lanes are closed because of road construction?

Visit the cityís street restrictions page here, or signup to have this information e-mailed to you by visiting www.peoriaaz.gov/e-news, then check mark the "Road Closures" box and follow the instructions.
 

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5. How do I report loud noise caused by construction work?

Call Code Compliance at (623) 773-7162 (Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.). After hours or weekends, call the Police Department non-emergency line at (623) 773-8311.


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6. How do I report excess dust from a construction project?

Signs are posted at each construction site with contact information to report complaints or concerns.  If no such sign is posted, call City of Peoria Code Compliance at (623) 773-7162.

 

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7. How do I know what projects the city is planning?

The cityís Building Peoria website highlights major projects either under construction or planned in the next few years. If you have questions about a project that you donít find on this site, e-mail us at information@peoriaaz.gov


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8. Iím concerned about speeding & cut-through traffic in my neighborhood Ė what can I do?

The Neighborhood Traffic Management Program (NTMP) is designed to reduce speeding and cut through traffic by partnering neighborhood leaders with the cityís traffic management staff. For more information on the program, visit the web site here.


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9. Why do some construction projects take so long?

Once a project is funded through the cityís Capital Improvement Program, it usually takes several years to complete depending on the complexity of the project. Why? Because there is an involved process (usually involving several different agencies and utilities) that must take place to ensure that projects are built to meet public expectations and comply with laws and regulations.

Take street construction projects as an example. First, these projects usually require the creation of design concept report, which is a process through which project parameters are defined and different construction alternatives are compared & contrasted. This process often involves public meetings through which residents who live near a project can provide input on how it is built. Once the design concept report is finalized, the project moves into the final design phase.

In final design, the ultimate configuration of the roadway is determined and construction documents are created. After the completion of final design, right of way for the project must be purchased. This land acquisition phase involves negotiating a fair purchase price with the legal representatives of (usually multiple) landowners. In some cases when a price cannot be agreed upon, the city may acquire the necessary right of way through the condemnation (eminent domain) process, which involves negotiating purchase price through the judicial system.

This process may also involve negotiating intergovernmental agreements (in cases where different governmental agencies are participating) and taking them to the appropriate elected bodies for approval. Another process that commonly occurs prior to the start of construction is the relocation of utilities. Things like underground fiber optic lines and overhead power lines often must be moved when new projects are built, and this requires coordination with various utility companies. Project design and relocation agreements must be completed, as must determination of who has prior rights (if utilities have prior rights, then the city has to pay for relocation of utilities). Once the details are determined, the utility relocation agreement must be approved by the Mayor and City Council. Once that agreement is approved, the utilities are, ideally, relocated prior to construction. (If not, there is a strong possibility that the project could be delayed at some point while waiting for utilities to relocate.)

Once the plans and agreements are in place, and the land is purchased, and the utilities relocated, the city then proceeds with the bid process, through which qualified firms submit proposals to build the project. Once a qualified firm is selected, the construction contract must be approved by the Mayor and City Council at a public meeting. After the contract is approved, the contractor is given a notice to proceed and construction can commence.

The process described here usually takes between one and two years prior to the start of construction for a project. Once work actually begins, projects can take anywhere from a few months to a couple of years depending on their scope and complexity.


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